2017 The Best Hot Cross Bun List

HISTORY

In many historically Christian countries, plain buns made without dairy products (forbidden in Lent until Palm Sunday) are traditionally eaten hot or toasted during Lent, beginning with the evening of Shrove Tuesday (the evening before Ash Wednesday) to midday Good Friday.

The ancient Greeks may have marked cakes with a cross.

One theory is that the Hot Cross Bun originates from St Albans, where Brother Thomas Rocliffe, a 14th Century monk at St Albans Abbey, developed a similar recipe called an ‘Alban Bun’ and distributed the bun to the local poor on Good Friday, starting in 1361.

In the time of Elizabeth I of England (1592), the London Clerk of Markets issued a decree forbidding the sale of hot cross buns and other spiced breads, except at burials, on Good Friday, or at Christmas. The punishment for transgressing the decree was forfeiture of all the forbidden product to the poor. As a result of this decree, hot cross buns at the time were primarily made in home kitchens. Further attempts to suppress the sale of these items took place during the reign of James I of England/James VI of Scotland (1603–1625). The first definite record of hot cross buns comes from a London street cry: “Good Friday comes this month, the old woman runs. With one or two a penny hot cross buns”, which appeared in Poor Robin’s Almanack for 1733. Food historian Ivan Day states, “The buns were made in London during the 18th century. But when you start looking for records or recipes earlier than that, you hit nothing.”

TRADITIONS

English folklore includes many superstitions surrounding hot cross buns. One of them says that buns baked and served on Good Friday will not spoil or grow mouldy during the subsequent year. Another encourages keeping such a bun for medicinal purposes. A piece of it given to someone ill is said to help them recover. If taken on a sea voyage, hot cross buns are said to protect against shipwreck. If hung in the kitchen, they are said to protect against fires and ensure that all breads turn out perfectly. The hanging bun is replaced each year.

Here is our joint decision on which bun was the better or worse, out of the ones we have sampled.

  1. Marks & Spencer The Bakery Kentish Bramley Apple Hot Cross Buns
  2. Marks & Spencer The Bakery St. Clements Hot Cross Buns
  3. Marks & Spencer The Bakery Luxury Hot Cross Buns
  4. Aldi Luxurious Zesty Cranberry & Orange Hot Cross Buns
  5. M&S Bakery Mini Chocolate & Orange Hot Cross Bun
  6. M&S Bakery Toffee Fudge & Belgian Chocolate Hot Cross Bun
  7. Waitrose Rich & Buttery Cherry & Almond Hot Cross Bun
  8. Morrisons Market St. Hot Cross Buns

 

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